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Tag: Brian Eno (page 1 of 7)

ARP Zebra

ARP is back with a new eleven track instrumental album entitled ‘Zebra’. The moniker of New York based multi-instrumentalist Alexis Georgopoulos, things have been quiet for ARP over the last couple of years. Never one to sit still and keen not to brand himself with any particular style, Georgopoulos continues his aural exploration and like the zebra itself, his latest work sees him revelling in contrast and duality, using a wider spectrum of musical colours than previously. Continue Reading ›

JON HASSELL Listening To Pictures

Avant garde trumpeter and composer Jon Hassell is best known for his collaborations with Brian Eno and David Sylvian. His ‘Fourth World, Volume 1: Possible Musics’ with Eno from 1980 is now considered a landmark in ambient and world music, combining airy electronic treatments on his trumpet with drones and sombre percussive colours often derived from ancient ghatams. Very much a sound painter, Hassell’s new album ‘Listening To Pictures’ introduces his idea of Vertical Listening. Continue Reading ›

BRIAN ENO Music For Installations

'Music For Installations' is a multi-album collection of new, rare and previously unreleased tracks from BRIAN ENO, recorded since 1986 for use in his art installations experimenting with light and video. Spread out over 6 CDs or 9 vinyl albums if you prefer the lengthy mood (which is essential in effective ambient music) to be broken by having to flip the record, the various works on ‘Music For Installations’ are for the most part equal to Eno’s best ambient opuses. Continue Reading ›

A Short Conversation with LADYTRON

Named after a wonderfully eclectic song from the first ROXY MUSIC album, appropriately it was Brian Eno who said that LADYTRON were “the best of English pop music”. Despite Eno’s description, one of the most distinctive aspects of LADYTRON is their diversity. With all systems go in the LADYTRON camp, Danny Hunt kindly took time out from the studio to chat to The Electricity Club about the new album, his favourite synths and his own career highlights. Continue Reading ›

TEC’s 2017 End Of Year Review

The world found itself in a rather antagonistic and divisive state this year, as if none of the lessons from the 20th Century’s noted conflicts and stand-offs had been learnt. After a slow start to 2017, there was a bumper crop of new music from a number of established artists. Overall, it was artists of a more mature disposition who held their heads high and delivered, as some newer acts went out of their way to test the patience of audiences by drowning them in sleep while coming over like TRAVIS on VSTs. Continue Reading ›

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