Tag: Dot Allison

30 Lost Art School Bops Of The Digital Era

Here are 30 songs which may have escaped attention as the world went grunge and then had an ongoing hangover in the wake of Britpop.

Denied mainstream recognition and now lost when looking from a UK perspective even within the dwindling synth music community, these offerings come from artists who have mostly remained in total obscurity.

However, some are highly established in their own right, albeit not necessarily in the electronic pop field.

As with the 30 Lost Obscure Alternatives Of The 45 RPM Era feature, acts who have since been featured on The Electricity Club like ARTHUR & MARTHA, DE/VISION, ONE DOVE, PEACH, WOLFSHEIM and YOUNGER YOUNGER 28s have not been included on this list.

Starting from 1992 when the CD established itself as the dominant format to the year before The Electricity Cub came into being, here are 30 Lost Art School Bops listed by year and then in alphabetical order…


VEGAS Walk Into The Wind (1992)

What happens when you cross FUN BOY THREE, EURYTHMICS and SHAKESPEARS SISTER? This lovely under rated electro-reggae tune featuring Terry Hall, David A Stewart and Siobhan Fahey! VEGAS was a one-off project when Hall and Stewart were between bands, with the former’s forlorn opening gambit of “You have to learn to love by loving” more than suiting the latter’s lush cinematic backdrop on the captivating noir of ‘Walk Into The Wind’.

Available on the album ‘Vegas’ via RCA Records

https://www.discogs.com/artist/1343740-Vegas-8


SVEN VÄTH L’Esperanza (1993)

Sven Väth is a Frankfurt based DJ whose his career started in 1982. Mixmag rated his album ‘Accident In Paradise’ one of the Top 50 dance albums of all time. From that, this synthpopped remix of its most accessible track ‘L’Esperanza’ recalled ‘Magic Fly’ by SPACE and captured the tranquillity of a swim with dolphins. The melodies sang despite the tune being totally instrumental while the groove drove along without being intrusive.

Available on the single ‘L’Esperanza’ via Eye Q / WEA Records

https://www.facebook.com/SvenVaethOfficial/


2WO THIRD3 Hear Me Calling (1994)

Hear Me Calling captured the spirit of early ultrapop DEPECHE MODE and even had CULTURE CLUB backing singer Helen Terry thrown into the mix of this infectiously catchy number. Although a publicly a trio, there was a silent fourth songwriting member who was represented by a cartoon character called Biff in the band’s promotional material. Biff was actually Richard Stannard who has since written songs for KYLIE MINOGUE, LITTLE BOOTS, MARINA & THE DIAMONDS and SPICE GIRLS.

Available on the single ‘Hear Me Calling’ via Epic Records

http://www.discogs.com/artist/2wo+Third3


INTASTELLA Grandmaster (1996)

INTASTELLA were formally indie rockers LAUGH, until they discovered singer Stella Grundy  and adapted their sound to a more dance-orientated style in a vein not dissimilar from fellow Mancunian’s HAPPY MONDAYS. Having had a minor hit with the SAINT ETIENNE flavoured cover of the FRANK VALLI Northern Soul favourite, the funkier electrovibe  of ‘Grandmaster’ was the follow-up and later featured on the soundtrack of the ‘9½ Weeks’ sequel ‘Love In Paris’.

Available on the album ‘What You Gonna Do’ via Planet 3 Records

https://www.facebook.com/Intastellastellagrundy/


INAURA Soap Opera (1996)

INAURA combined NINE INCH NAILS and DURAN DURAN, with the latter every much in mind when the band were signed to EMI. Produced by Steve Osborne, the metallic finish of ‘Soap Opera’ gave a rock edge to the electronically driven sound. But despite securing a support slot with THE HUMAN LEAGUE, the band got emboiled in internal record company politics with EMI actively trying to bury the band. The shelved album ‘One Million Smiles’ eventually secured an independent release in 1998.

Available on the album ‘One Million Smiles’ via ORG Records

https://www.discogs.com/artist/61052-Inaura


ORLANDO Just For A Second (1996)

Melody Maker’s Simon Price announced the arrival of a new scene of New Romantic revivalists, with a bold headline declaring, “ROMO – The Future Pop Explosion!” From these Romantic Modernists came ORLANDO who combined stylish, synthesized dance-pop with a love of classic songwriting. ‘Just For A Second’ was their best song, with elements of PET SHOP BOYS euphoric flavour as reimagined by the boy bands of the day, combined with an emotive lyrical backdrop.

Available on the album ‘Passive Soul’ via Blanco Y Negro Records

https://www.discogs.com/artist/125280-Orlando-4


SEXUS The Official End Of It All (1996)

Also seen as part of the Romo movement were SEXUS, a Manchester duo comprising of David Savage and Paul Southern  Signed by ZTT, ‘The Official End Of It All’ was their second single and recalled ELECTRONIC’s ‘Getting Away With It’. The pair recorded a full album with Trevor Horn but it remains unmixed and unreleased. The duo would later team up again musically under the name PSYCHODELICS.

Available on the single ‘The Official End Of It All’ via ZTT Records

http://www.psychodelicates.com/sexus.htm


MONO Life In Mono (1997)

MONO were Siobhan de Maré and Martin Virgo, who found their cinematic sound lumped in with trip hop movement that spawned SNEAKER PIMPS and PORTISHEAD. A mysterious Gallic flavour crossed with samples from John Barry’s soundtrack to ‘The Ipcress File’ provided the song’s spy drama chill. The track was later incorporated into a contemporary film adaptation  of ‘Great Expectations’ which starred Ethan Hawke, Gwyneth Paltrow and Hank Azaria. SPICE GIRLS’ Emma Bunton recorded a cover of it in 2006.

Available on the single ‘Life in Mono’ via Echo Records

https://www.discogs.com/artist/1564-Mono


BROADCAST Come On Let’s Go (2000)

The late Trish Keenan’s ice maiden cool was instrumental to BROADCAST’s cognoscenti appeal and with their experimental electronica, they won many fans among the cognoscenti. ‘Come On Let’s Go’ was their most accessible offering with its spy drama feel, vintage organic textures and Keenan’s sweet nonchalant vocal tones. Futuristic yet with a Cold War chill, this pushed all the tender buttons. The band were a favourite of Matt Groening, creator of ‘The Simpsons’.

Available on the album ‘The Noise Made By People’ via Warp Records

http://warp.net/records/broadcast


QUEEN OF JAPAN I Was Made For Loving You (2000)

QUEEN OF JAPAN were a colourful European trio consisting of singer Koneko alongside eccentric producers Jo Ashito and Jason Arigato. Specialising in dance covers of an incongruous origin like JOHN LENNON and QUEEN, their fun electronic sound took on a distinct sinister turn with this brilliant synthesized interpretation of rock legends KISS’ neo-discofied 1977 anthem. The track gained prominence after being included as part of 2 MANY DJ’s ‘As Heard On Radio Soulwax Part 2’ DJ set in 2003.

Available on the album ‘Headrush’ via Echohammer Records

http://www.queenofjapan.net


DOT ALLISON Substance (2002)

Following Ms Allison’s pop flavoured debut album ‘Afterglow’ in 1999 and prior to her ‘Aftersun’ collaboration with MASSIVE ATTACK, the former ONE DOVE vocalist experimented with some lo-fi electro sounds alongside some more folky acoustic excursions on her album ‘We Are Science’. Playing squelch games over stuttering percussive loops, Allison’s enigmatic breathy vocal style almost acts as another instrument in a mildly hallucinogenic dance fashion.

Available on the album ‘We Are Science’ via Mantra Recordings

http://www.dotallison.com


MANNEQUIN Take Me To The Club (2003)

Apparently based on true events, ‘Party Monster’ starring Macaulay Culkin, Seth Green and Chlӧe Savigny was effectively ‘Electroclash – The Movie’; ‘Take Me To The Club’, written and produced by Bruno Coviell, captured the tension and euphoria of nightlife. Electrofied slap bass and sinister sequences added some gothic grandeur to the aural hedonism. “I only feel right under bright lights… take me to the club” was the profound proclamation!

Available on the album ‘Party Monster’ (V/A) via TVT Soundtrax

https://www.facebook.com/partymonsterfan


SYNTAX Pray (2003)

‘I Feel Love’ meets THE PSYCHEDELIC FURS on this duo’s amazing debut single, SYNTAX consisted of Jan Burton and ex-FLUKE member Mike Tournier. The 8 minute full length version possessed a pulsing hypnotic quality while spacey Sci-Fi synths and full-fat sequences recalled a bygone disco age but updating the template for a new century. Dark but immensely danceable!

Available on the album ‘Meccano Mind’ via Illustrious/Sony Music

http://www.syntax.uk.com/


WHITE TOWN Whenever I Say Hello (2003)

WHITE TOWN aka Jyoti Mishra had a freak No1 hit with ‘Your Woman’ in 1997 but kept a low profile, carving out an independent musical career with little regard for public profile. Influenced by his heroes OMD and DEPECHE MODE, ‘Whenever I Say Hello’ first appeared on Ninth Wave’s ‘Electricity 2’ compilation and was the highlight of his album ‘Don’t Mention The War’, eventually released in 2006. A wonderful lonely paean to lost love, this does sound like ‘Things You Said’ reimagined for ‘A Broken Frame’.

Available on the album ‘Don’t Mention The War’ via Bzangy Records

http://www.whitetown.co.uk


DARREN HAYES I Like The Way (2004)

Sony Music were none too happy when the former SAVAGE GARDEN front man veered from his drippy ballads to go electro! ‘I Like The Way’ was the highlight from his album ‘The Tension & The Spark’, the title of which came from the chorus of this spiky piece of synthpop. Like ERASURE gone all aggressive if you can believe that, Hayes and Sony Music parted ways following this fuzzy excursion.

Available on the album ‘The Tension & The Spark’ via Sony Music

http://www.darrenhayes.com


VIC TWENTY Txt Msg (2004)

THE great lost act of the synthesizer revival has to be VIC TWENTY. Blowing away ERASURE while supporting them on their muted covers tour, Piney Gir and Adrian Morris showed promise with their cartoon-like girl/boy synthpop. One of the highlights in their live set was an ironic electronic reconstruction of ‘Sweet Child O’ Mine’. Released on Mute, ‘Text Msg’ was their only single as a duo, a quirky narrative of the modern generation who can only dump hapless lovers by mobile phone.

Available on the single ‘Txt Msg’ via Mute Records

http://www.victwenty.free-online.co.uk


COSAQUITOS EN GLOBO Fantasy (2005)

Argentine combo COSAQUITOS EN GLOBO originally started out as a duo comprising of Maru Pardo Saguier and Sebastian Cordoves. With a heavy KRAFTWERK and GIORGIO MORODER influence but adding a rock edge, ‘Fantasy’ from their eponymous debut album was a perfect demonstration of their strong melodies based around club friendly synthetic grooves and new wave sensibilities. Their most recent album ‘Humanum’ came out in September 2017.

Available on the album ‘Cosaquitos En Globo’ via https://cosaquitosenglobo.bandcamp.com/album/cosaquitos-en-globo

http://www.cosaquitosenglobo.com.ar/


DELAYS Valentine (2005)

After the succes of  THE KILLERS, indie bands were starting to embrace synths again and DELAYS almost went the full hog with this Trevor Horn assisted electronic disco number. The pulsing sequences and syncopated rhythm section were just pure DURAN DURAN, while Greg Gilbert’s raspy falsetto in the soaring chorus and choppy guitar ensured the band weren’t totally detached from their roots.

Available on the single ‘Valentine’ via Rough Trade Records

http://www.thedelays.co.uk


JULIET Avalon (2005)

Before he worked with MADONNA, NEW ORDER, THE KILLERS, KYLIE MINOGUE, TAKE THAT and PET SHOP BOYS, Stuart Price produced and co-wrote most of the only album by Philadelphia songstress Juliet Richardson. Driven by a heavy percussive mantra coupled to a deep bass rumble, her sultry soulful vocals worked well within the cool electro backing to provide a wonderful sexually charged atmosphere. Richardson is now a yoga teacher with a young family.

Available on the album ‘Random Order’ via Virgin Records

https://www.discogs.com/artist/93024-Juliet


THE MODERN Jane Falls Down (2005)

This promising band took the best of New Romantic thrill and a tight Stephen Hague production for a brilliant single with a killer chorus and solid beats, reinforced by a big reverberating bassline. Despite a support slot with HEAVEN 17, a chart scandal involving over enthusiastic management on their second single ‘Industry’ destroyed all momentum and the band retreated, re-emerging later as MATINEE CLUB before becoming THE MODERN again! Nathan Cooper has since reappeared as KID KASIO.

Available on the single ‘Jane Falls Down’ via Universal Music

https://www.themodernband.com/


LUKE HAINES Off My Rocker At The Art School Bop – Richard X Mix (2006)

Once referred to as the Adolf Hitler of Britpop by the music press, Luke Haines’ memoir ‘Bad Vibes: Britpop & My Part In Its Downfall’ suggested that BLUR’s Damon Alban deserved to be nominated for that title far more! An installation of danceable pop terrorism by THE AUTEURS and BLACK BOX RECORDER leader, with a full fat octave driven electro mix by Richard X, this gleefully satirised the Shoreditch club scene with a bitter attack on its array of poseurs.

Available on the single ‘Going Off My Rocker At The Art School Bop’ via Fantastic Plastic

http://www.lukehaines.co.uk


PROTOCOL Love Is My Drug (2006)

PROTOCOL had some Romo flair and despite being almost entirely based on ‘Atomic’ by BLONDIE, second single ‘Where’s The Pleasure?’ secured that all important radio play. But despite this, Polydor pulled the plug on their excellent follow-up ‘Love Is My Drug’ and the promising debut album ‘Rules Of Engagement’ despite sending out promos to the press and filming a promo video. Lead singer John Pritchard took another punt at stardom by participating in the 2013 series of ‘The Voice’.

Available on the album ‘Rules Of Engagement’ via https://protocoluk.bandcamp.com/

https://rkukmedia.co.uk/Protocol/


STEFY Chelsea (2006)

This was an excellent ‘Sweet Dreams’ pastiche from vocalist Stefy Rae and producer Jimmy Harry. Aimed at the teen pop market with its Orange County brat subject matter, ‘Chelsea’ was more sophisticated than it appeared and was probably three years ahead of its time. Co-written by the soon-to-be ubiquitous producer Greg Kurstin and accompanied by a video featuring an Adam West cameo, if this had come out in 2009, it probably would have been a Top 10 hit.

Available on the album ‘The Orange Album’ via Wind-Up Records

https://www.discogs.com/artist/558653-Stefy-2


DEAD DISCO You’re Out (2007)

Victoria Hesketh before she was LITTLE BOOTS, she came to together with Lucy Catherwood and Marie France at Leeds University to produce a series of well received spikey pop numbers before splitting. Their final single ‘You’re Out’ was produced by Greg Kurstin and the start of a more electronic sound in the mix. Treated guitars, fuzzy bass and subtle synths all merged together in a feisty cocktail and the seed of the raw excitement found its way into songs like ‘Meddle’.

Available on the single ‘You’re Out’ via 679/Atlantic Records

https://www.discogs.com/artist/526693-Dead-Disco


FROST Sleepwalker (2007)

Consisting of Aggie Peterson and Per Martinsen, FROST have described their music as upbeat space-pop.  This was beautiful electronic dance music from the enigmatic Norwegian duo with Peterson’s soaring soprano and the gorgeous synth vibrato putting minds into a marvellous trance. ‘Sleepwalker’ was the sort of song you would want to play at a rave in the snow! their cool cover of OMD’s ‘Messages’, from the ‘Love! Revolution’ album which ‘Sleepwalker’ came, is also a worthy listen.

Available on the album ‘Love! Revolution!’ via Frost World Recordings

http://www.frostworld.no


HEARTBREAK We’re Back (2008)

Italo disco was a much maligned form of electro kitsch but was rooted in GIORGIO MORODER which eventually influenced NEW ORDER and PET SHOP BOYS; Anglo-Argentine duo HEARTBREAK revived the genre, complete with accents, “wo-woah-ah” chants and heavy dance rhythms. On great catchy songs such as ‘We’re Back’, the sweaty impassioned charisma of vocalist Sebastian Muravchik was more than convincing while Ali Renault provided the meaty electronic backing.

Available on the album ‘Lies’ via Lex Records

http://lexprojects.com/releases/heartbreak-lies/


POLARKREIS 18  The Colour Of Snow (2008)

The Dresden sextet were a dreamy but epic cross between A-HA and SIGUR RÓS. Singer Felix Räuber’s falsetto voice polarised but the frantic driven tempo, dramatic electronic strings and rousing melancholic chorus of ‘The Colour Of Snow’ made it a fine follow-up their German No1 ‘Allein Allein’ and gave the band enough of a reputation to be invited to support DEPECHE MODE at their Leipzig gigs in 2009.

Available on the album ‘The Colour of Snow’ via Vertigo Records

http://www.polarkreis18.de


RED BLOODED WOMEN You Made Your Bed (2008)

Pure octave shift disco heaven on this ode to the IKEA generation by modern electronic take on BANANARAMA. Despite being all under 25, these three ladies grew up to the sound of the synthesizer and learned to dance to the beat of electronic drums via their mothers’ ERASURE and A-HA singles. Paying girl group homage to both YAZOO and DEPECHE MODE, RED BLOODED WOMEN sounded not unlike GIRLS ALOUD produced by Daniel Miller!

Available on the album ‘Electronically Yours Vol 1’ (V/A) via Undo Records

https://www.discogs.com/artist/1202070-Red-Blooded-Women


KATSEN Florian (2009)

KATSEN were a short lived Brighton duo comprising of Donna Grimaldi and Chris Blackburn who crossed CRYSTAL CASTLES with YELLOW MAGIC ORCHESTRA for their own brand of quirky synthpop. ‘Florian’ with its mournful melodica line inspired by ‘Kommetenmelodie 2’ was yet another in a tradition of songs dedicated to the enigmatic quiet man of KRAFTWERK which have included ‘V2 Schneider’ and ‘Rolf & Florian Go Hawaiian’ (sic).

Available on the album ‘It Hertz!’ via Thee Sheffield Phonographic Corporation

http://katsen.com/


SPUTNIKO! The Google Song (2009)

SPUTNIKO! (real name Hiromi Ozaki) showcased her brand of laptop pop around London where she was based. “Exploring intersections between technology and popular culture” as reflected by titles such as ‘The Skype Song’ and ‘The Mixi Song’, her most immediate track has been ‘The Google Song’, a story of love in the modern computer age. Too shy to approach the object of her desire, she simply went home to her faithful laptop and googled him!! “I like you” she proclaimed. It was tremendously catchy too!

Available on the DVD ‘Parakonpe 3000’ via 360° Records

http://sputniko.com/


Text by Chi Ming Lai
29th September 2017

SOFT METALS Interview

Making sine waves on their extensive tour of North America at the moment are LA based duo SOFT METALS.

The couple met through a mutual love of art and music, releasing their first EP ‘The Cold World Melts’ in 2010. Fusing Detroit techno and elements of acid house with European experimental forms, Patricia Hall and Ian Hicks have just released ‘Lenses’.

It’s the follow-up to their well received eponymous debut album, through notable Brooklyn indie label Captured Tracks. Over an arsenal of cool vintage synths and classic analogue drum machines, SOFT METALS’ repeating rhythms and incessant arpeggios at times recall ORBITAL, particularly with tracks featuring female vocalists such as ‘Funny Break’.

They have an accessibly minimalistic sound with Hall’s pretty vocals reminiscent of DOT ALLISON’s flirtatious aura combined with ASTRUD GILBERTO’s innocent vulnerability as brilliantly showcased on ‘Voices’, ‘Do You Remember?’ and ‘Psychic Driving’. The result is a sexy ice maiden allure over bright hypnotic electronic sketches that comes over exquisitely Métaux Mous.

Compared with other North American duos, they are maybe a bit shinier than CRYSTAL CASTLES and perhaps have a more accessible sound than XENO & OAKLANDER. But that’s not to say SOFT METALS don’t have much weightier influences as their affectionate cover of THROBBING GRISTLE’s ‘Hot On The Heels Of Love’ proves.

In the midst of a busy touring schedule, SOFT METALS were kind enough to took time out to chat to The Electricity Club…

How did you arrive at using vintage synthesizers for your sound?

Ian: It is the sound of a lot of music that I like; software instruments don’t sound the same. If you want a specific sound, you have to get the instrument. The tactical interface, the limitations of the machines and the quirks of the individual interfaces inspire sounds that you might have otherwise not discovered.

Which particular synths are your favourites and what is it about them that you like?

Ian: I like the Pro-One. It has the 2 track step sequencer which is good for sketching out simple melodies and basslines. It also has very extensive modulation capabilities which can result in near modular sounding tones. I also like the Mono/Poly. It has a really nice SSM filter which is really smooth and silky sounding. Having 4 oscillators that can have different wave shapes and octaves can result in complex tones. If you couple that with the arppegiator, it creates a very hypnotic soundscape.

Patricia: My favorite synth to play is the Juno 60. It’s a great synth for live performances since it has patch memory and the layout is very user friendly. Its tones are a big part of the SOFT METALS sound.

You appear to have quite European influences in your sound with the rhythmical template locked in more American dance forms?

Ian: We draw a lot of or inspiration from early Detroit techno from artists such as DREXCIYA, CARL CRAIG, etc. We continue to be influenced by early Warp records releases and early industrial/underground synth music like THROBBING GRISTLE, CHRIS & COSEY and LIAISONS DANGEREUSES.

SOFT METALS suzy poling-thumb

Photo by Suzy Poling

What is the creative dynamic between the two of you when writing and recording?

Ian: Usually we start a recording session with a jam. That could come from a beat and a bassline.

It usually begins with the 808 and Pro-One. We try to keep it pretty simple, maybe adding an additional melodic line from the JX-3P or Juno 60.

Patricia will take the raw form of the jam and work in vocals. Once a solid vocal idea is in place, we edit, arrange, and add flourishes to the song.

With EDM being so popular in the US plus the more underground scenes like in New York with XENO & OAKLANDER, Wierd Records and the Minimal Wave label, do you feel an affinity with any of the movements or tribes?

Ian: Yes, we played at Weird Records night a few years ago. We are big fans of XENO & OAKLANDER, Weird Records and the Minimal Wave label.

To The Electricity Club’s ears, SOFT METALS have quite warm sound despite the chills as it were…

Patricia: The dark/cold place that our music comes from is a mysterious place inside your psyche rather than a dystopian outside world. We are more interested in psychedelia and exploring the stratification of consciousness. It’s an adventure of the mind and perception. A feeling of caution and reluctance is there, but it’s never cold or unfeeling. There are moments of love, beauty, doubt, sadness, ecstasy, and fear, and curiosity in our music. Our music is about intimacy with yourself, the person you love, a feeling of wonder and the weight of life. Some people say that synthesizers can’t convey emotions like traditional instruments, but I disagree. I hear my emotions reflected in synthetic tones.

soft-metals-voices-150x150How do you look back on your first album back in 2011?

Patricia: I was really proud of us when we made our debut album and I am really proud of our new album ‘Lenses’. SOFT METALS is about learning and growing and dancing and feeling. We give our best to our music and as time goes on, I think we get better and better at what we do. Each recording is a snapshot into out lives, feelings, and skill level at the time. It’s exciting for us to see the evolution.

‘Lenses’ appears to be a natural progression from your debut, how do you see it?

Patricia: I agree. It is a natural progression. Our music comes about very organically. It’s a reflection of what we are feeling and thinking at the time. It’s a pure expression.

You’re experimenting more with tuning, both synthetically and vocally on this album?

Patricia: On the song ‘Lenses’, the bassline and the lead melody are a shallow experiment with bi-tonality. We were inspired by DREXCIYA with that one. They play with that dynamic a lot and we love it. This is also a device employed by Darius Milhaud who has been an inspirational figure in composition for Ian for a long time. We wanted to try it out.

 SOFT METALS-Patricia-Brock Fansler

Photo by Brock Fansler

‘Hourglass’ is a rather fabulous instrumental. How do you decide whether a track should have a vocal or not as you have done a fair number?

Patricia: I really wanted to write lyrics for that one, but was never quite satisfied with what I came up with. I decided it would be better to let that one be an instrumental. I think it holds up on its own. It’s nice to give the listener a chance to interpret its meaning on its own rather than direct them with words.

It was quite a brave move to put a lengthier ambient track such as ‘Interobserver’ on the album?

Patricia: The first inspirations of SOFT METALS are the improvised sessions we do together. We don’t want to get too far removed from what breathed life into SOFT METALS.

Over your two albums, which of your tracks have been your favourites and why?

Ian: I like the mood of ‘No Turning Back’. I was really happy with how the drums ended up sounding on that song.

On ‘Lenses’, I like its simplicity and off-kilter feeling. It feels like it’s not quite right, but that’s what makes it engaging. ‘Celestial Call’ was recorded all in one take with no overdubs. I loved how it turned out.

Patricia: ‘Psychic Driving’ has probably been the best showcase of my voice in a song and when I perform it well at a show, it seems to transfix and captivate the audience. The melodies and tones are beautiful. ‘In the Air’ is my favorite SOFT METALS song to dance to. We have been getting a great response from the audience with that one. ‘Always’ is a lot of fun to me, too. I love its spaced out vibe.

You are a well presented duo… is the visual aspect of SOFT METALS important? Will you utilise video more in the future?

Patricia: Yes, we have been taking a DVD of original video art created by our friends Eva Aguila and Brock Fansler on tour with us to be projected at our shows. It looks amazing. We shot 3 music videos for this album and will be in the videos which is a new for us.

You’re embarking on a very extensive tour of North America at the moment. How are you finding it and does being a couple make it easier, or more challenging?

Patricia: So far the tour has been going very well. We are currently driving through Wyoming in what seems to be the middle of nowhere. The shows have been a lot of fun. I think we needed to do an extensive tour. Previous to this, we only felt comfortable with the studio environment which made live performances come off stiff. We have shaken off our inhibitions and have become more adaptable to various environments. I’m having a lot of fun and I’m not tired yet. Every show has been different, but that’s a good thing. Being a couple makes it feel like we are on holiday.

What next for SOFT METALS. Have you any plans to come to Europe?

Patricia: We definitely want to come to Europe.


The Electricity Club gives its warmest thanks to SOFT METALS

Special thanks also to Sara Casella at Captured Tracks

softmetals_cover_042913The albums ‘Soft Metals’ and ‘Lenses’ are released by Captured Tracks and available in CD, vinyl and download formats

They undertake an extensive tour of the USA and Canada throughout August and early September. Please visit https://www.facebook.com/softmetals for more details

http://soundcloud.com/soft-metals

http://capturedtracks.com/artists/softmetals/


Text and Interview by Chi Ming Lai
17th August 2013

Lost Albums: ONE DOVE Morning Dove White

ONE DOVE were a moody Glaswegian trio comprised of Ian Carmichael, Jim McKinven and Dot Allison. Their only album ‘Morning Dove White’ took its title from the Native American name of Elvis Presley’s grandmother.

McKinven was best known for his stint in ALTERED IMAGES during their ‘Happy Birthday’ and ‘Pinky Blue’ period. This project couldn’t have been more different, especially when compared with his former band mate Johnny McElhone who formed TEXAS with Sharleen Spiteri.

Producer Andrew Weatherall signed them to his Junior Boys Own label after hearing their independently released single ‘Fallen’ and became involved in the recording process, along with Gary Burns and Jagz Kooner from SABRES OF PARADISE who both later went on to form THE ALOOF.

Seasoned by the icy but angelic voice of Dot Allison, ‘Morning Dove White’ was something truly unique in the sphere of post-Acid House electronic dance music. Dot Allison’s resigned opening line on ‘Fallen’ of  “I don’t know why I’m telling you any of this…” is simply seductive. The accompanying groovy rhythm section on a slight off-beat makes it the most club flavoured track on here with the reggae-inflections of LEFTFIELD’s ‘Release The Pressure’ as its backdrop.

Although often referred to as a dance act, ONE DOVE’s sound was actually characterised by primarily electronic textures with heavy processing influenced by laid back Jamaican dub and Eno-esque ambience. This recalled the work of former PUBLIC IMAGE LIMITED bassist Jah Wobble who incidentally guested on ‘Morning Dove White’ and later recorded an album with Brian Eno called ‘Spinner’.

The single versions of ‘Breakdown’ and ‘White Love’ reworked by Stephen Hague are actually quite brilliant, accessible and are far less intimidating than the full-on dub attack of the lengthy album cuts. But even as radio mixes, they are hardly the glossy pop of SAINT ETIENNE.

London Records had taken over the Junior Boys Own label and wanted to make ONE DOVE’s music more radio friendly. The band may have been unhappy about the commercialisation of their sound and there is something to be said about fighting for your art, but what is the point if people can’t access your work through conventional media and grow into it, especially if it is relatively radical? In hindsight, London Records were being well intentioned, but this led to a dispute which delayed the release ‘Morning Dove White’ for a full year until 1993.

A compromise was reached with ONE DOVE working with Stephen Hague in the studio during the remix sessions. ‘White Love’ is wonderfully dreamy with its subtle piano and gospel salvo predating MOBY’s ‘Play’ by several years. Their biggest hit ‘Breakdown’ has a surprising VAN MORRISON influence, taking its chorus from THEM’s ‘Here Comes The Night’. In both, Dot Allison’s sexily whispering vocals are the distinctive key.

But the album’s crowning glory is the Phil Spector in the 23rd Century mystique of the stupendous ‘Why Don’t You Take Me?’ featuring Wall Of Sound effects galore and reverbed steel drum samples, it is almost funereal but actually possesses an uplifting quality. Although there was a Stephen Hague assisted mix sans steel drums available on the single release, in this case it was Andrew Weatherall’s original vision that is won the day.

Of the supporting features on ‘Morning Dove White’, ‘There Goes The Cure’ is very ‘Twin Peaks’ in atmosphere, punctuated by Dot Allison’s chants of “he’s gone”. Constructed around some tinkling piano and deep ambient drones, its heart is suddenly invaded by Jah Wobble’s distinctive bass run before returning full circle with the aid of a dramatic percussive climax.

Both ‘Sirens’ and ‘My Friend’ recall Weatherall’s work on PRIMAL SCREAM’s ‘Screamadelica’ while ‘Transient Truth’ is a superb instrumental with an ‘Ipcress File’ meets KING TUBBY twist. The echoey drum machine and the various incessantly repeated spy film riffs provide a suitably hypnotic soundtrack.

With a promising debut album greeted by enormous praise and critical approval, a follow-up was eagerly anticipated.

A reworking of DOLLY PARTON’s ‘Jolene’ and the song ‘Skanga’ which were included as B-sides to’ Why Don’t You Take Me?’ gave an indication of the heavier dub reggae sound that was being pursued. There was even rumours of a cover version of SIMON DUPREE & THE BIG SOUND’s ‘Kites’, the concept of which had the potential to be amazing.

But there was no second album. It was recorded but never released. Frustrated and drained by business politics, ONE DOVE disbanded in 1996. Dot Allison went on to release a series of acclaimed solo albums including ‘Afterglow’ and ‘We Are Science’ as well as working with DEATH IN VEGAS and MASSIVE ATTACK.

‘Morning Dove White’, like THE ALOOF’s ‘Sinking’, is infinitely superior to the over rated trip-hop albums such as PORTISHEAD’s ‘Dummy’ or TRICKY’s ‘Maxinquaye’ which dominated the mellow coffee-table dance niche of the time. Some of the full on dub excursions have degrees of over-indulgence and may not be to everyone’s taste, but one of the beauties of modern digital formats is the ability to compile a version of the album to suit the mood.

It may not have been the journey that the band intended but this collection is a challenging and rewarding listen that deserves reappraisal.


‘Morning Dove White’ is still available on CD via London Records

www.onedove.net

www.dotallison.com


Text by Chi Ming Lai
23rd June 2012

SUNDAY GIRL Live at London XOYO

The Electricity Club admits it didn’t find the music of SUNDAY GIRL immediately appealing.

Her first couple of pleasant offerings appeared to showcase her out as a model with ambitions to become the next ELLIE GOULDING.

But her new single ‘Stop Hey!’ and songs from her album sampler sent out to music journalists revealed her to be a darker, more interesting proposition altogether… like a 21st Century DOT ALLISON with touches of BAT FOR LASHES and EMILIE SIMON.

More recently, she’s also added DJ-ing to her talents and impressively reworked EVERYTHING EVERYTHING’s ‘Photoshop Handsome’ into her own stark synthetic style. As for her fashion aspirations, these are really no less part of her than say MIRRORS’ own sartorial instincts based on Gilbert & George. For SUNDAY GIRL, it’s Coco Chanel and Andy Warhol’s muse Edie Sedgwick. Meanwhile, her modelling contract with River Island has transpired to be a way of supporting her music career while following her other passions. At the end of the day, art, music and fashion all link.

SUNDAY GIRL is Jade Williams, a once shy young lady from the leafy suburb of Broxbourne, Hertfordshire who suffered so much from stage fright that her mother took her to a hypnotist. She was studying for an art degree before deciding to pursue musical ambitions. Inspired by acts such as GOLDFRAPP, her songs have an angsty edge covered in a layered wall of sound with some simple but rousing choruses.

And tonight at her final show of 2010 following a successful support stint with ELLIE GOULDING, she exudes the talent and engaging down-to-earth charm that brought her to the attention of Geffen Records earlier in the year. The stage is covered in fairy lights and ribbons but it’s the dense post-punk of ’24 Hours’ which starts proceedings.

Jade’s raspy but breathy voice is what singles her out from her contemporaries and it adds an almost Parisian feel to her songs which when added with some eerie synth, provide a distinctive sneery chill.

Her folktronica tinged debut single ‘Four Floors’ follows next and in a live context, this possesses some gritty power not apparent on the original. New songs ‘Human Love’ and ‘Brixton’ are also aired with the moodiness of the latter having cinematic potential in a David Lynch film.

Her most impressive number is the magnificent ‘All The Songs’. Percussively punchy, it takes on a more conventional frame tonight away from the squelchy electro of the recorded version. But this doesn’t distract from the quality of her baby. Working with producers such as Jim Eliot and Diplo (who between them can namedrop KYLIE MINOGUE, LADYHAWKE and ROBYN in their CVs), Jade is in good hands as far as the studio is concerned and things look promising for her as yet untitled album due out in March 2011.

Her cover of Italo-disco classic ‘Self Control’ goes down a storm and even provokes a laugh from Jade as some of the crowd come in too early for the “Woah-ooh-oooh” refrain. “Not yet…” she shouts, slightly putting her off cue! Ending with the superb ‘Stop Hey!’ she gives her all in this full-on avant pop tune that mixes the huge rhythm section from MGMT’s ‘Time To Pretend’ with the chorus synthline of MIRRORS’ ‘Broken By Silence’.

Combining the harshness of new wave and electro with the prettiness of pop, the show is a fabulous live presentation that brings out the smiles from Jade and the cheers from the audience. She is a fine, natural live performer, probably more confident and comfortable than either LA ROUX or LITTLE BOOTS at the same stage in their career.

Her non-inclusion in the BBC Sound Of 2011 long list remains a mystery but perhaps, this will be a blessing in disguise. Maybe this will allow SUNDAY GIRL valuable time to develop her obvious potential and carve out a niche for herself as an artist who has the ability to bridge into several spheres simultaneously.


‘Stop Hey!’ is released by Geffen Records on 16th January 2011

www.wearesundaygirl.com

www.myspace.com/wearesundaygirl


Text by Chi Ming Lai
Photos by Richard Price
19th December 2010