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Tag: Steve Jansen (page 1 of 2)

EXIT NORTH Interview

EXIT NORTH are the brooding quartet who comprise of Thomas Feiner, Steve Jansen, Ulf Jansson and Charles Storm. The combo are about to release their magnificent debut album ‘Book of Romance and Dust’, a captivating collection of nine songs seeded in Gothenburg and swathed in a variety of wintery instrumental colours. Steve Jansen kindly chatted to The Electricity Club about the genesis and realisation of EXIT NORTH. Continue Reading ›

The Electronic Legacy of AMBIENT

Ambient electronic music is a much misunderstood genre. Modern ambient probably came to prominence with BRIAN ENO. Restricted to one album per moniker or collaborative partnership, here are the twenty long players which form The Electricity Club’s Electronic Legacy of Ambient. Acting as a straightforward introduction to the genre, it refers to many artists whose comparatively mainstream works may already be familiar. Continue Reading ›

Sons Of Pioneers: The Legacy of JAPAN

Although their recorded output covered just five albums over a four year period, JAPAN are one of the most acclaimed bands from the era which many came to know as New Romantic. JAPAN’s final two studio albums ‘Gentlemen Take Polaroids’ and ‘Tin Drum’ are being reissued as Abbey Road Half-Speed mastered 2LP gatefold vinyl editions with two tracks per side. Along with the pair’s predecessor 'Quiet Life', they formed the Holy Trinity of JAPAN records. Continue Reading ›

A Short Conversation with STEVE JANSEN

Steve Jansen has been very busy of late over the last 12 months with projects involving both music and photography. In 2015, the one-time drummer of JAPAN published ‘Through A Quiet Window’, a book of his photos taken between 1978-1991. He kindly chatted to The Electricity Club about the genesis of his new album ‘Corridor’ and ‘Through A Quiet Window’ while also shedding light on the perception of JAPAN as a band at the height of their artistic success. Continue Reading ›

TEC’s 2017 End Of Year Review

The world found itself in a rather antagonistic and divisive state this year, as if none of the lessons from the 20th Century’s noted conflicts and stand-offs had been learnt. After a slow start to 2017, there was a bumper crop of new music from a number of established artists. Overall, it was artists of a more mature disposition who held their heads high and delivered, as some newer acts went out of their way to test the patience of audiences by drowning them in sleep while coming over like TRAVIS on VSTs. Continue Reading ›

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