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Tag: Fad Gadget (page 1 of 3)

A Beginner’s Guide To DANIEL MILLER

This history of Mute Records and its esteemed founder Daniel Miller is more than well documented. He began taking an interest in synthesizers for making pop music after hearing KRAFTWERK’s ‘Autobahn’. With a vast and varied portfolio to investigate, The Electricity Club looks back at the creative career of Daniel Miller in music via eighteen of his productions and remixes, with a restriction of one track per artist moniker, presented in yearly, then alphabetical order. Continue Reading ›

FINLAY SHAKESPEARE Solemnities

For Bristol-based Finlay Shakespeare, his interest in synths came from his parents’ record collection. The material on his debut album ‘Domestic Economy’ was initiated by improvisation whilst being recorded live, with one of its highlights ‘Amsterdam’ being an example in modern Motorik. But ‘Solemnities’ is a definite progression, offering more shape and structure than its predecessor, but maintaining a distinct post-punk anguish. Continue Reading ›

THE INVINCIBLE SPIRIT Interview

The musical vehicle of Thomas Lüdke, German EBM veterans THE INVINCIBLE SPIRIT first gained wider recognition in Europe with ‘Push! in 1986. With the release of possibly his most accessible song yet in ‘Coming Home’, Thomas Lüdke has promised a new album very soon. In a break from recording, Thomas Lüdke spoke to The Electricity Club about the past, present and future of THE INVINCIBLE SPIRIT. Continue Reading ›

The Best Of FAD GADGET

Although originally released 18 years ago on CD, this compilation of Frank Tovey’s singles-based material as FAD GADGET is now debuting on vinyl for the first time with an identical track listing spread over four sides. Looking back retrospectively, one can see how Tovey’s incarnation as FAD GADGET provided a perfect middle ground between DEPECHE MODE’s early synthpop and the darker Industrial experimentation of acts such as THROBBING GRISTLE. Continue Reading ›

ELECTRICAL LANGUAGE Independent British Synth Pop 78-84

From Cherry Red Records, the makers of the ‘Close To The Noise Floor’ trilogy showcasing formative and experimental electronic music from the UK, Europe and North America, comes their most accessible electronic collection yet. Subtitled ‘Independent British Synth Pop 78-84’, ‘Electrical Language’ is a boxed set covering the post-punk period when all that synthesizer experimentation and noise terrorism morphed into pop. This was pop in a very loose manner with melodies, riffs and danceable rhythms. Largely eschewing the guitar and the drum kit, this was a fresh movement which sprung from a generation haunted by the spectre of the Cold War, Mutually Assured Destruction and the Winter of Discontent. Continue Reading ›

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